Pourquoi vous aimer apprendre le français

Pourquoi vous aimer apprendre le français?
France is a romance language of the Indo-European language. French evolved out of the Gallo-Romance dialects spoken in northern France. Old French and Middle French are included in the language’s early form. Across five different continents, French is an official language in 29 countries most of which are members of the Organization Internationate de la Francophonie (OIF). OIF is the community of 84 countries which share the official use or teaching of French. French is the second most studied language worldwide and the 18th most natively spoken language in the world. French has been the official language of the Republic since 1992 under the Constitution of France.

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Figure 1: The countries which speak French
I choose to learn French because of the tourist attractions in France, famous French people, French foods, fashion, perfumes, wines, weather and the government.

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The most famous tourist attraction in Paris, France is the Eiffel Tower. The construction of Eiffel Tower started at 28 January 1887 and completed by 15 March 1889. Maurice Koechlin and Emile Nougier are the two senior engineers working for the Compahnie des Esablissements Eiffel attribute the design of Eiffel Tower and Eiffel Tower is named after the engineer Gustave Eiffel.
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Figure 2: Gustave Eiffel
Eiffel Tower is 324 meter tall (about the height of 81-storey building) and the tallest structure in Paris. The base of Eiffel Tower is a square measuring 125 meters on each side. Now, excluding transmitter, Eiffel Tower is the second tallest free-standing structure in France. Eiffel Tower has three levels for visitors, with restaurants on the first and second level. In European Union, the top level’s upper platform is the highest observation deck accessible to the public. 6.91 million people ascended Eiffel Tower in 2015 and it is the most-visited paid monument in the world.

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Figure 3: The Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower is the world’s tallest structure before the Chrysler Building was built in New York in 1930. La Dame de Fer, “The iron Lady” is the nickname of France for the tower. The weight of Eiffel tower is approximately 10,000 tons. Eiffel tower also has 5 billion lights on it.

Next, the Louvre Museum is also a tourist attraction in Paris, France other than the Eiffel Tower. The Louvre Museum is a historic monument and the world’s largest art museum. Over an area of 72,735 square meters, approximately 38,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are exhibited. The Louvre was the world’s most visited art museum in 2017, receiving 8.1 million visitors. The museum originally built as the Louvre castle in the late 12th to 13th century under Philip II and the museum is housed in Louvre Palace. Louvre museum opened with an exhibition of 537 paintings on 10 August 1793 (the first anniversary of the monarchy’s demise), the majority of the works being royal and confiscated church property. The museum was closed in 1796 until 1801 because of the structural problem with the building.

right32800Figure 4: The Louvre Museum
France is a country rich with beautiful and big castle. There are approximately more than 5000 castle in France. The castle in France including Carcassonne, Mont Saint-Michel, Château de Chambord, Palace of Versailles, Château de Chenonceau, Roquetaillade, Château d’Angers, Palace of Fontainebleau, Château de Joux and Castle Montrésor.

Mont Saint-Michel was an island known in the 8th century which was originally called Mont-Tombe. Mont-Saint-Michel is almost circular. Most of the time it is surrounded by vast sandbanks and when the tides are very high, it becomes an island. It was particularly difficult to reach the island before the construction of the 3,000-foot causeway that connect the island to lands because of quicksand and very fast-rising tides. The island fortify in 1256, resisted sieges during the Hundred Years’ War between England and France from 1337 to 1453 and the French Wars of religion from 1562 to 1598.

The Palace of Versailles is one of the greatest achievement in French 17th century art. For 3 years, it has been listed as a world Heritage. Louis XIII’s old hunting was transformed when he installed the Court and government there in 1682 and extended by his son, Louis XIV. A succession of kings continued to embellish the Palace up until the French Revolution. Until now, the Palace contains 2,300 rooms spread over 63,145 m2. Louis XIV forced by the French Revolution to leave Versailles for Paris in 1789. The Palace would never again be a royal residence and when it became the Museum of the History of France in 837, a new role was assigned to it in the 19th century by order of King Louis-Philippe, who came to the throne in 1830. The rooms of the palace were then devoted to housing important events that had marked the History of France and new collections of paintings and sculptures representing great figures. These collections continued to be expanded until the early 20th century. The protective role of a medieval stronghold had never been played by the Palace of Versailles. Versailles was only a village at that time and it was destroyed in 1673 to make way for the new town Louis XIV 3338195313626500left312263500wished to create.

Figure 5: The palace of Versailles Figure 6: Mont-Saint-Michel

For the food in France also attract me to learn French. Croissant is named for its historical crescent shape and is a buttery, flaky and viennoiserie pastry. Viennoserie are made of a layered yeast-leavened dough. In a technique called laminating, the dough is layered with butter, rolled and folded several times in succession, then rolled into a sheet. Crescent-shaped breads have been made since the Renaissance and have long been a staple of Austrian and French bakeries and patisseries. In France, Croissant are a common part of a continental breakfast.

Baguette is a thin and long loaf of French bread. Baguette is commonly made from basic lean dough and is distinguishable by its crisp crust and length. Usually, a baguette has a diameter of about five or six centimeters and length of about 65 centimeters. Baguette is made from wheat flour, yeast, water and common salt and it may contain up to 0.5% soya flour, 2% broad bean flour and 0.3% wheat malt flour. Although baguette are made around the world, they are closely connected to France. Not all long loaves are baguette in France, there are many other breads that look similar to baguette like bustard and ficelle. In France, a baguette must weigh 250 grams. It is very often used for sandwiches, usually of the submarine sandwich type. Slices of baguette are spread with butter and jam and dunked in bowls of hot chocolate or coffee as part of the traditional continental breakfast in France. Baguette also made with other dough outside France and even classical French-style recipes vary from place to place.

4411980155956000French macaroon is a sweet meringue-based confection made with egg white, granulated sugar, almond powder or ground almond, icing sugar and food coloring. A typical macaroon is presented with a ganache, buttercream or jam filling sandwiched between two such cookies, akin to a sandwiches cookies and is mildly moist and easily melts in the mouth.

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Figure 7: Croissant Figure 8: BaguetteFigure 9: Macaroon

References
TOUREIFFEL.PARIS THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE OF THE EIFFEL TOWER https://www.toureiffel.paris/en
Jonnes, Jill (2009). Eiffel’s Tower: The Thrilling Story Behind Paris’s Beloved Monument …Elizabeth Palermo, Associate Editor, 28 September 2017 https://www.livescience.com/29391-eiffel-tower.html
https://query.wikidata.org/embed.html#SELECT%20%3Fchateau%20%3FchateauLabel%20WHERE%20%7B%0A%20%20SERVICE%20wikibase%3Alabel%20%7B%20bd%3AserviceParam%20wikibase%3Alanguage%20%22%5BAUTO_LANGUAGE%5D%2Cen%22.%20%7D%0A%20%20%3Fchateau%20wdt%3AP31%2Fwdt%3AP279*%20wd%3AQ751876.%0A%20%20%3Fchateau%20wdt%3AP17%20wd%3AQ142.%0A%20%20minus%20%7B%3Fchateau%20wdt%3AP576%20%5B%5D.%7D%20%0A%7D%0A
https://www.britannica.com/place/Mont-Saint-Michel