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1. Understand the purpose of induction for health and social care or children and young people’s settings
1.1 Explain why induction is important for practitioners, individuals and organisations
Induction is a process which starts when a new member of staff is brought into an organisation. Or an activity that is designed to provide new-starters with the information they need, as well as getting them up to speed on how the organisation works. However, it is not restricted to new staff. There could be a need to induction employees to help adjust to new tasks in a changed working environment.
Through induction organisations can maintain and improve their standards of care and support. Induction processes are important to ensuring that new staff are productive as quickly as possible, and should play a key role in knowledge management initiatives. The benefits of an induction programme for staff are obvious. It enables somebody to become a useful, integrated member of a team through a gradual planned process, rather than being ‘thrown in at the deep end’ without the proper knowledge required to do their job or the understanding of how the job fits in with the rest of the organisation. Despite this, most organisations have inadequate or ad-hoc staff induction processes, with many relying solely on staff just ‘working it out as they go’.

Induction also serves as a first stage in the succession planning process to facilitate a smooth transition in the future should certain staff leave the organisation. individuals such as service user are central to service delivery. In relation to individuals accessing care service within the organisation, an induction interview upon entry is important in introducing and familiarising a service user to the services available to them, introducing them to key staff, any occupancy condition that might need highlight and generally making them feel informed and looked after through the process.

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1.2 Identify information and support materials that are available to promote effective induction
My company is committed to the principle that safer recruitment, induction and supervision of staff are essential to the safeguarding of adults with care and support needs. To this effect, My company has generic recruitment policies and procedures in place. This chapter provides additional, specific guidance in relation to safer recruitment practices at each step of the generic recruitment process, which aims to prevent unsuitable persons from working with adults, either as a paid member of staff or volunteer whether they are permanent, temporary or agency staff or recruited from abroad. In addition it applies to staff / volunteers who are seen by adults with care and support needs as trustworthy and / or have access to confidential information. This may include administrative staff, caretakers, and maintenance workers for example.

My company is committed to the prevention of abuse and neglect and promoting the wellbeing of adults with care and support needs, and expects all staff and volunteers to abide and embed these principles in their daily practice. My company has robust recruitment and selection procedures in place to identify and deter people who might abuse or neglect adults with care and support needs or who are otherwise unsuitable for employment / volunteering.  My company’s policies and Staff Handbook provide internal guidance for staff which relate clearly to the SAB policy and which set out the responsibilities of all staff to operate within it. This includes guidance on:
identifying adults who are experiencing or at risk of abuse or neglect;
recognising risk from different sources and in different situations and recognising abusive or neglectful behaviour from other service users, colleagues, and family members;
routes for making a referral and channels of communication within and beyond the agency;
organisational and individual responsibilities for whistleblowing
assurances of protection for whistle blowers;
working within best practice as specified in contracts;
working within and co-operating with regulatory mechanisms;
working within agreed operational guidelines to maintain best practice in relation to:
challenging or distressing behaviour;
personal and intimate care;
control and restraint;
gender identity and sexual orientation;
medication;
handling of people’s money;
risk assessment and management
My company Staff Handbook also provides guidance outlining the rights of staff and how employers will respond where abuse is alleged against them within either a criminal or disciplinary context.

Advertisements for staff will include the above principles and reference the requirement for the successful applicant to undertake an enhanced criminal records check, as appropriate.

The My company job description (JD) for all job holders is specific about extent of contact and levels of responsibility the post holder will have for adults with care and support needs, including prevention of abuse or neglect at operational and / or strategic levels.

The My company person specification (PS) includes any other requirements the post holder will need in order to perform the role in relation to working with adults with care and support needs, including experience specific to the post, and for example working with adults with learning disabilities or dementia. The successful candidate should be able to demonstrate such required competencies and qualities.

The recruitment pack highlights that a robust selection process is in place, and includes My company’s safeguarding adults’ policy. Also stated is that proof of identity will be required, as well as a criminal records / Disclosure and Barring Service check, as appropriate.

My company uses its own agreed application forms for applicants – this is available on Office 365 or from the HR Department. My company does not accept curriculum vitae instead of an application forms, as this may only contain information the person wants to present rather than all the information that My company requires to facilitate shortlisting. The application form also includes reference to My company’s commitment to safeguarding adults with care and support needs.

Application forms should be scrutinised for any unexplained gaps in employment history, or other potential concerns in relation to safeguarding adults. References should be sought on all candidates who are shortlisted for interview.

Where an applicant is not currently working with adults with care and support needs but has done so previously, a reference should also be obtained from the last such employer, in addition to the current / most recent employer. This should include confirmation of the reason why the applicant left the post.

The referee should state:
whether they are satisfied the applicant has the ability and is suitable to undertake the job, and if not why;
whether they were the subject of any disciplinary sanctions or any allegations made against them, which relate to adults (including outcomes).

The interview should assess the merits of the candidate against the JD and PS, and explore their suitability to work with adults with care and support needs. The interview panel should state to each candidate there will be a requirement to complete an application for a Disclosure and Barring Service check, confirm their identity and receive satisfactory references. Where possible, one member of the panel will be trained in safer recruitment practice.

The panel should explore with the candidate:
their attitude towards adults with care and support needs, including any specific needs of adults of the service, including reasons why they want to work with such adults;
their ability and commitment to the organisation’s agenda for safeguarding and promoting wellbeing;
any gaps in their employment history;
discrepancies / concerns in relation to any information provided by either them or a referee;
if they wish to declare anything in relation to applying for a criminal records check
their understanding of appropriate relationships and personal boundaries;
emotional resilience in working with in challenging situations.

Adults who use the service can make very valuable contributions as part of recruitment of new staff. Where possible their participation should be built into the process at all levels, from administration posts to senior positions. Their roles should be clarified with the adults who participate, so they understand how their views will be considered and what weighting they will be given.

Offers of appoint will be conditional on receipt of satisfactory checks and references. This should include checks in relation to any concerns about their own children.

In the following circumstances, the applicant should be reported to the police:
they are found to be on a list concerning their suitability to work with adults / have been disqualified from working with adults by a Court;
they provided false information in relation to their application;
there are serious concerns about their suitability to work with adults.

The level of disclosure requested – either Standard or Enhanced – should reflect the nature of the post and degree of contact with adults or with confidential information. A record should be kept of the date when the disclosure was obtained, by whom, level of disclosure and unique reference number.

There are three levels of a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check. Each contains different information and the eligibility for each check is set out in law. They are:
Standard check: This allows employers to access the criminal record history of people working, or seeking to work, in certain positions, especially those that involve working with children or adults in specific situations. A standard check discloses details of an individual’s convictions, cautions, reprimands and warnings recorded on police systems and includes both ‘spent’ and ‘unspent’ convictions;
Enhanced check: This discloses the same information provided on a Standard certificate, together with any local police information that the police believe is relevant and ought to be disclosed;
Enhanced with barred list check: This check includes the same level of disclosure as the enhanced check, plus a check of the appropriate barred lists. An individual may only be checked against the children’s and adults’ barred lists if their job falls within the definition of ‘regulated activity’ with children and/or adults.

It should be noted that in ‘signing off’ or agreeing a personal budget or personal health budget a local authority may add conditions such as a DBS check as part of its risk assessment of safeguarding in specific cases. The local authority may also require personal budget holders using Direct Payments to tell them who they employ.

The same checks should be made on overseas staff as for all other staff.

Where an applicant has worked or been resident overseas in the previous five years, My company should obtain a check of the applicant’s criminal record from the relevant authority in that country as well as information about their conduct. It should be noted that not all overseas organisations / countries are able to provide such information.

Written confirmation should be provided by the agency that the necessary checks have been undertaken and are satisfactory.

In relation to each candidate who is appointed, records should be made of:
any specific information raised with them (for example gaps in employment history) and their explanation and any corroborating information;
the outcome of their criminal records check including unique reference number and date;
reasons for decision to appoint despite criminal convictions, including risk assessment undertaken.

On starting in a new post, the member of staff should be given written information in relation to:
My company’s Adult Policies, Procedures and Practice resource (APPP), including key chapters for induction;
safeguarding adults policies and procedures;
know the identity of and how to contact staff with designated safeguarding responsibilities; what to do if they have concerns about the safety of a child or adult;
other relevant procedures for example whistleblowing and allegations
clear written statement of the standards of behaviour, code of conduct and the boundaries of appropriate behaviour expected of staff (found in Staff Handbook);
safeguarding adults and children training, and booked on relevant courses (found in Staff Training and Development);
supervision and appraisal processes and know when the first sessions will take place (see also Staff Handbook).

Regular supervision sessions should take place as per the organisation’s policies and procedures, as should annual staff reviews – as detailed in the Staff Handbook. Both processes aide both the organisation and member of staff by ensuring:
staff are up to date with current practices in relation to their specific area of work and safeguarding adults in general (both local and national issues);
identify areas for development;
provide opportunities to identify and address any concerns about behaviour and / or attitudes;
develop any required action plans and review arrangements.

Criminal records checks on existing staff should be carried out every three years, unless there are grounds for concern about the member of staff’s suitability to work with adults (please note the employee can decline). Staff can register with the Disclosure and Barring Service Update Service, in relation to criminal records rechecking. For more information please see the Disclosure and Barring Service website.

1.3 Explain the link between induction processes, qualifications and progression routes in the sector
Employing a skilled and motivated workforce is vital to ensuring good quality services are provided to adults with care and support needs, and their carers.

It will also assist to:
improve service satisfaction levels of adults and their carers;
enhance staff job satisfaction;
embed standards and safe working practices;
reduce the number of complaints from adults and carers;
reduce the number of staff disciplinary hearings and dismissals;
improve staff retention levels.

As part of a wider competency framework which also includes staff supervision and appraisal, workforce development links staff learning and development to other activities, such as strategic planning, workforce planning, performance management and career development.

The Company is committed to providing equal opportunity of access to training and development initiatives to all staff within the organisation in accordance with the Equal Opportunities Policy as defined in the Staff Handbook. The Company’s training and development programme sets out to enhance the knowledge, skills and abilities of its staff to ensure the highest standards of care for service users and the highest standards of management for staff and resources.

Training, learning and development needs of individual staff members must be carried out at the start of their employment and reviewed at appropriate intervals during the course of their employment.

Staff must be supported to undertake training, learning and development to enable them to fulfil the requirements of their role. It is the responsibility of line managers to identify, by discussion with staff, individual training and development needs against service user, Company, legal and regulatory requirements through induction, observation, supervision and performance appraisal. Before the beginning of each financial year the line manager should define and plan the staff training programme and agree the training budget with their line manager. They should complete the appropriate training request forms for each employee and forward these to their line manager with a copy to the regional coordinator as required.

Where appropriate, staff must be supervised until they can demonstrate required / acceptable levels of competence to carry out their role unsupervised.

Health, social and other care professionals must have access to clinical or professional supervision as required, in line with the requirements of the relevant professional regulator. Staff should receive appropriate ongoing or periodic supervision in their role to make sure competence is maintained.

Staff should be supported to make sure they are can participate in:
statutory training;
other mandatory training, as defined by the provider for their role;
any additional training identified as necessary to carry out regulated activities as part of their job duties and, in particular, to maintain necessary skills to meet the needs of the people they care for and support;
other learning and development opportunities required to enable them to fulfil their role. This includes first aid training for people working in the adult social care sector.

All learning and development and required training completed should be monitored and appropriate action taken quickly when training requirements are not being met.

Staff should receive regular appraisal of their performance in their role from an appropriately skilled and experienced person and any training, learning and development needs should be identified, planned for and supported.

Managers must support staff to obtain appropriate further qualifications that would enable them to continue to perform their role, and not act in a way that prevents or limits them from obtaining further qualifications appropriate to their role.

Where registration with a professional body is a requirement of the role, managers must ensure staff are able to meet the requirements of their relevant professional regulator throughout their employment, such as criteria for continuing professional development. Managers must not act in a way that prevents, limits or would result in staff not meeting requirements required.

Staff should be supported to join Accredited Registers if they wish.

The induction programme must prepare staff for their role. Line managers are responsible for registering new employees for induction training through e-Learning. All staff are given a My company induction booklet on day one of their employment which they must complete. Evidence of learning and completion of induction must be signed off by the new employee and their line manager within three months for adult services. Induction for non-care functions must also be completed within the first three months of employment. All induction records must be kept on the personal file with a copy sent to Kingston Office for logging purposes. The Care Certificate must also be completed on the e-learning system and assessors are responsible for inducting and mentoring all new staff through this via observations and competency assessments. The Care Certificate must be completed within 12 weeks of employment to ensure they are supported, skilled and assessed as competent to carry out their roles.

Line managers must ensure that at any one time if possible 50% of their staff in adult services are working towards or have completed a minimum of National Vocational Qualification (NVQ) / Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF). Documented evidence of NVQ / QCF completion signed by an external verifier must be kept on the personal file with a copy sent to My company Head Office and Helmsman.

Directors must ensure that all managers of a residential home have completed an NVQ level 4 / QCF level 5 or be working towards it and that documented evidence of completion, signed off by the external verifier, is kept on the personal file.

Other training and development initiatives may be agreed between the line manager and employee and implemented in accordance with service needs.

If an employee fails to complete a Company funded course he/she will be required to refund to the Company all costs incurred. In such circumstances the employee will be expected to complete the course using their own source of funding.

If an employee leaves the Company having completed an approved course he/she will be required to reimburse the Company as follows:
up to 6 months after completion of a course – 100%;
between 6 and 9 months – 75%;
between 9 and 12 months – 50%;
over 12 months – nil.

The line manager must ensure that the employee signs a refund agreement when registering a Company funded course.

Non-attendance and / or lateness without good reason could result in formal disciplinary action being taken against the employee. All training providers have the right to refuse the entry of a latecomer if the lateness is such that entry would cause disruption. Services will be charged for non-attendance where a latecomer has been refused entry by the training provider and a repeat course has to be arranged. Failure of staff to attend pre-booked training courses (without reasonable explanation) will result in the cost of the training being deducted from their employees pay.

Whilst attending a course participants must show respect by being attentive to trainers, by listening and not interrupting others, and by valuing all opinions expressed. Mobile phones should be switched off.

For the most part the mandatory qualifications can be gained on the job or in the employee’s own time without the need for time off from work. Where attendance to a pre-authorised course requires travel and overnight accommodation, reasonable expenses will be reimbursed subject to receipt.

Employees in organisations of 250 employees or more and in those with fewer than 250, from 6th April 2011, have a statutory right to request unpaid time off for training, subject to certain conditions, which they believe would improve their effectiveness in their job and the performance of the business. The training may be an accredited programme leading to a qualification, or unaccredited training to help develop specific skills relevant to the job, workplace or business.

To be eligible, you must have been an employee of the Company for a continuous period of at least 26 weeks.

Any request must be in writing and contain the following information:
a statement that the application is an ‘application under section 63D Employment Rights Act 1996’;
the subject matter of the proposed training or study;
where and when the proposed training or study would take place;
who would provide or supervise it;
what qualification it would lead to (if any);
how you think the proposed training or study would improve your effectiveness in the business and the performance of the business;
the date of the application;
the date and method – for example email or letter – that any previous application was submitted.

The submission should be made to your line manager and only one application may be considered in any 12 month period.

Within 28 days of receiving a valid request, the Company will either accept the request on the basis of the information provided or meet with you to discuss your request and, within 14 days of that meeting, will inform you of the decision in writing. A time extension of up to 28 days is permitted in the event of the absence of the appropriate manager at the time of submission. The Company may request further information before the request can be considered.

You have the right to be accompanied by a work colleague or Trade Union Representative at any meetings relating to your request.

Grounds for refusing a request are:
the proposed study or training would not improve your effectiveness in the business;
the proposed study or training would not improve the performance of the business;
the burden of additional costs;
agreeing to the request would have a detrimental effect on the ability to meet customer demand;
inability to reorganise work among existing staff;
inability to recruit additional staff;
agreeing to the request would have a detrimental impact on quality;
agreeing to the request would have a detrimental impact on performance;
there would be an insufficiency of work during the periods you would be proposing to work;
there are planned structural changes during the proposed study or training period.

If the request is accepted, the Company’s Training Management Service ‘Helmsman’ will confirm in writing to the regional coordinator the subject of the study or training, where and when it is expected to take place and over what period, who will provide or supervise the training, what qualification (if any) the training will lead to, how the training time will be taken. The regional coordinator will confirm whether it will be paid, unpaid, or whether you would work flexibly whilst undertaking the training, and how the costs of the training will be met. The regional coordinator will then provide you with all of the details My companying the training that has been planned and will be delivered to you.

If the request is refused, this will be confirmed in writing stating: the business reasons for rejection; why the business reason, or reasons, apply in these circumstances; the appeal procedure; the date of the notice.

Any appeal must be submitted in writing within 14 days of the date of receiving the refusal notice. An appeal meeting must be held within 14 days of receiving the appeal notice and the outcome of the appeal must be communicated in writing within 14 days of the meeting.

If the decision is still to refuse the request, this must set out the grounds for the decision and why the grounds apply in these circumstances.

1.4 Analyse the role of the induction process in supporting others to understand the values, principles and agreed ways of working within a work setting
In 2010 the care quality commission listed the minimum amount of information that should be covered by the induction process for new staff. These include service aims and objectives:
Specific service user information
Relevant policies and procedures
Health and safety compliancy and emergency measures
Event incident reporting
Service user rights
However, this is basic information and in reality the induction process can be what make the individual makes it. it is important that it is not just treated as a box ticking exercise and must be seen as a important opportunity to introduce new employee to the culture and ways of working within the company. It is an opportunity, particularly when inducting new staff, to ‘get the message across’ to ensure it effectively reflects the employer ‘brand’ and the values the organisation is promoting; the ethos. Well considered induction programmes can increase productivity within a company and reduce the turnover of staff in the short term. The length and nature of the process is determined by the complexity of the job and the background of a new employee. The induction programme must prepare staff for their role. Line managers are responsible for registering new employees for induction training through e-Learning. All staff are given a My company induction booklet on day one of their employment which they must complete. Evidence of learning and completion of induction must be signed off by the new employee and their line manager within three months for adult services. Induction for non-care functions must also be completed within the first three months of employment. All induction records must be kept on the personal file with a copy sent to head Office for logging purposes. The Care Certificate must also be completed on the e-learning system and assessors are responsible for inducting and mentoring all new staff through this via observations and competency assessments. The Care Certificate must be completed within 12 weeks of employment to ensure they are supported, skilled and assessed as competent to carry out their roles.

1.5 Analyse the role of induction in safeguarding individuals and others within a work setting
My company is committed to the prevention of abuse and neglect and promoting the wellbeing of adults with care and support needs, and expects all staff and volunteers to abide and embed these principles in their daily practice. My company has robust recruitment and selection procedures in place to identify and deter people who might abuse or neglect adults with care and support needs or who are otherwise unsuitable for employment / volunteering.  My company’s policies and Staff Handbook provide internal guidance for staff which relate clearly to the SAB policy and which set out the responsibilities of all staff to operate within it.
The induction programme must prepare staff for their role. Line managers are responsible for registering new employees for induction training through e-Learning. All staff are given a My company induction booklet on day one of their employment which they must complete. Evidence of learning and completion of induction must be signed off by the new employee and their line manager within three months for adult services. Induction for non-care functions must also be completed within the first three months of employment. All induction records must be kept on the personal file with a copy sent to Head Office for logging purposes. The Care Certificate must also be completed on the e-learning system and assessors are responsible for inducting and mentoring all new staff through this via observations and competency assessments. The Care Certificate must be completed within 12 weeks of employment Skills for Care to ensure they are supported, skilled and assessed as competent to carry out their roles.

The Care Certificate is an agreed set of standards that sets out the knowledge, skills and behaviours expected of specific job roles in the health and social care sectors. It’s made up of the 15 minimum standards that should be covered if new starter is ‘new to care’ and should form part of a induction programme.

The standards
Understand your role
Your personal development
Duty of care
Equality and diversity
Work in a person centred way              
Communication
Privacy and dignity
Fluids and nutrition
Awareness of mental health, dementia and learning disabilities
Safeguarding adults
Safeguarding children
Basic life support
Health and safety
Handling information
Infection prevention and control
These are updated from annually up to 3 years depending on which through e-Learning and with class room based learning.
2. Be able to manage the induction process in health, social care and children and young people’s work settings
2.1 Explain the factors that influence induction processes for practitioners
The need for new staff to become competent at their jobs can sometimes be seen to be at odds with their understandable desire to get involved as quickly as possible. However, the first few months of a persons’ working life are crucial in enabling them to acquire the necessary occupational, job-specific and behavioural skills they need in order to become more ’employable’. Put simply, employability is the ‘realisation of potential through sustainable employment the acquisition by an individual of the qualities and competencies required to meet the changing needs of employers and thereby help to realise his or her aspirations and potential to work’. Hillage and Pollard 1998
The induction process should be viewed as the start of an employee’s knowledge learning with and organisation. In other words, the first day of the performance management programme. The foundation for many of the key factors that influence an employee’s performance management programme. The foundation for many of the key factors that influence an employee’s performance and job satisfaction is set during the induction process. It is not enough to just read off regulations and the job description. The impressions made when someone starts work for a new employer have lasting impact on how they see the employer brand. Roles and responsibilities must be clearly defined and discussed as a knowledge learning opportunity.
A lack of clear definition of a rota can lead to low performance and other problems. It is important for new employee to be inducted into the organisational culture rather than just being shown an organisational structure chart. Taking a 360-degree approach and showing a new member of staff around, introducing them to senior staff as well as other staff members, will in effect ‘bring the chart to life’ and help a new employee feel part of the organisation and culture. As a result, from day one the employees objectives will be more aligned with the goals and values of the organisation which should lead to better motivation and loyalty.

4. Be able to evaluate the induction process in health and social care or children and young people’s settings
4.1 Explain the importance of continuous organisational improvement in the provision of induction
Continuous improvement is a type of change that is focused on increasing the effectiveness and or the efficiency of an organisation to fulfil its policy and objectives. As a process it is an ongoing cycle of evaluating current performance, identifying opportunities for enhancement, taking action, and then re-evaluating performance. Putting it simply, it means ‘getting better all the time’. The success of continuous improvement is dependent upon managers and staff members knowing what to do and how to do it, which requires an understanding of how organisations work and how to manage the process of change. The culture of an organisation provides are solved, openness to evaluation methods etc. my company is committed to promoting continuous learning and developing a learning culture.
From the start of being employed by my company (induction), care staff are expected to play an active part in identifying their development needs and working with the organisation to meet these. As a consequence of personal and organisational improvement, service users can be assured that they are receiving the best service possible. The important of continuous development is recognised in The Care Certificate must be completed within 12 weeks. It is the first step in a process, as new employees would then be responsible, with their line manager, for creating an ongoing personal development plan (PDP). The organisation’s commitment to staff improvement can be demonstrated by both policy and practice in recruiting and retaining a well-qualified and well-motivated workforce. Through supervision and appraisal, the success of CPD activities can be evaluated, along with outcomes, particularly on the working practices of the home on which I work, with this provision can be improved as a quality assurance process.

Ref:
http://www.skillsforcare.org.uk/Documents/Learning-and-development/Care-Certificate/The-Care-Certificate-Standards.pdfwww.cqc.org.uk
Regard staff hand book
http://www.scirp.org/reference/ReferencesPapers.aspx?ReferenceID=1720260

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