The American Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) essays

The American Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) has risen in the past decade to be the second most expensive means-tested program after Medicaid. During President Bush's presidency, SNAP rapidly developed into something that would succumb to corruption and was not helpful in the war against poverty as declared on 1965 by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The SNAP program, the third attempt at a food stamp program, introduced in 2000 is an inefficient program that loosened the requirements for enrollment, opened many loopholes susceptible to corruption, and does not adequately help decrease food insecurity of many households.
Thefirst requirement for qualifying for food stamps is to have a gross income of 130% below the poverty and a net income 100% below the income. This is a respectable requirement because many families that make below the poverty line cannot make ends meet between paying bills and putting food on the table during recessions. The problem is that states miss many SNAP recipients that are above the poverty line through sporadic audits."SNAP recipients with incomes above the poverty threshold have risen from 12 percent of SNAP households to 16.7 percent"(Tanner 8). Another requirement specifically for able-bodied people without kids or a family to support are required to be employed, and clock above 30 hours, or must participate in a SNAP "workfare" program for at least 20 hours per week. Although on paper these requirements seem adequate, in actuality the amount of SNAP recipients that do either of these things are at an all time low. On top of that many of these workfare programs tend to be subsidized jobs that are not steady for of income for families (Carroll 1). 44% of SNAP nonelderly adult recipients were not looking for work or employed (Tanner 9). Many of these families are not at fault but due to problems in the administration it has caused for loose interpretations of i…

Escape from the Western Diet by Michael Pollan essays

Stop! Don’t eat that Whopper, along with a regular diet of fast foods like it along with processed foods; it could lead to health risks that can potentially put your life in danger. Michael Pollan, a writer on food and eating, writes that “Escape from the Western Diet,” all the fast food, all candy, processed food, and all ice cream we eat is killing us. He also says that to stop the western diet we have to stop eating and thinking that way. Pollan argues that we need to stop eating a Western Diet. Eating fast foods and processed foods can be dangerous to your body because it can cause diabetes, heart disease, and cholesterol problems.
First, Pollan begins with his own research about the threat of diabetes into theories about the lipid, carbohydrate, and the neolipid hypothesis. He says that “people eating a Western diet are prone to a complex of chronic diseases that seldom strike people eating more traditional diets” (Pollan 421). Pollan point is that if you eat a lot of fast food on a daily basis and you don;t burn off what you eat you will get diabetes versus a person who eats right and works out. Due to the increase in people getting diabetes new treatments and procedures have to be done.
Second, on every street there is fast food restaurant. By having fast food restaurants everywhere, people are eating more junk food causing more people to have heart disease. Denis Burkitt who is an English doctor stationed in Africa during World War II says that “The only way we are going to reduce disease is to go backwards to the life style of our ancestors” (Burkitt 423). What Burkitt is saying is that he agrees with Pollan and introduces a way to solve the Western Diet problem. Burkitt thinks that if we go out and hunt for our food like our ancestors did, instead of going to Publix and buying meat, chicken, and/or fish to actually get it ourselves. If we do this the all the steroids and growth hormones that food companies put i…

The Madness of Macbeth essays

In Shakespeare’s great tragedy, Macbeth, the eponymous character;s imagination allows him to see the consequences of the unethical acts he is committing. However, his greed begins to dominate his guilty thoughts, and his insanity becomes progressively more evident. In light of the M;Naghten, Federal, and Penal Code laws, Macbeth would not be found fit to stand trial by reason of insanity. According to the Canadian Mental Health Association, Macbeth would display characteristics of being a paranoid schizophrenic, as seen in his poor mental condition and vacuous behaviour when he speaks to the three witches, visualizes the floating dagger, and his obsession with the idea of being invincible.
Macbeth;s behavior during the play could lead the reader to believe that Macbeth is crazy. However, in light of today;s medical standards, Macbeth could be considered a victim of paranoid schizophrenia due to his mood swings, auditory hallucinations, and delusions. In the beginning of the play, Macbeth starts out as a noble warrior who would give up his life for the protection of the King. But soon after, his greed overtakes his morals and Macbeth is driven to do whatever it takes to achieve his wants. In Act 1, sc 2, Macbeth had protected his King and his sons, and proved his loyalty by fighting to protect Malcolm. However, several scenes later, Macbeth begins to consider the idea of murdering the King (Act 1, sc 7). His opinion and mood fluctuate a great deal before Macbeth accepts what must be done “If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me, Without my stir” (Act 1, sc 3) and blames fate for whatever may happen. In Act 2, sc 1, when he hallucinates a floating bloody dagger being led to him, Macbeth commits to the idea of murdering King Duncan. The dagger, in Macbeth;s mind is showing him what must be done. After Macbeth has killed the King,he imagined he heard a voice cry out: ;Sleep no more, Macbeth…

Bellevue Hospital's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program essays

Dr. Julie Holland, a board certified psychiatrist, worked the weekend at Bellevue Hospital's Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program. Patients are sometimes prisoners, sometimes people recently arrested, sometimes injured people referred to the psych doctors from other hospital departments. There are also patients who walk in for help, or maybe to fake their way into getting a bed for the night. Dr. Holland's job was mainly to perform a sort of mental health triage, trying to determine if a person should be admitted or discharged, or trying to determine if a person is fit to stand trial. Dr. Holland takes us through her journey from how she started medical school to her experiences in Bellevue.
Dr. Holland encounters many patients with different psychiatric symptoms and diagnosis. One of the patients that werefirst introduced to the readers was a twenty-three-year-old patient named Joshua Silver. He was taken in by the NYPD for nudity in the middle of Times Square. What's interesting about this patient is that he didn't seem like a criminal. It was obvious that his illogic mind caused him to do such abnormal actions. He didn't hurt anyone. He simply viewed the world as art including the humans who live in it. We were all art to Joshua Silver. Mr. J, a thirty-five-year-old Hispanic male with a history of schizophrenia arrived at the hospital. His symptoms were severe. He believed that he would confront people with tattoos and piercings because they were all in league with Satan. This manic man may pose a threat to people because we can question his definition of "confront". Mr. S, a thirty-six-year-old Hispanic man with a history of depression banged his head repeatedly against the wall in a suicide attempt. We then find out that Mr. S was positive for cocaine. A thirty-eight-year-old transexual black male walked into the ER with a complaint of being raped. Dr. Holland knew she was one of the…

From Castro To Castro: What's Different in U.S. – Cuba Relations essays

In October of 1962, tensions were still high from the Cold War Era. Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro agreed to put nuclear missiles on Cuba, provoking a response from the United States. The U.S. then quarantine's Cuba while putting the U.S. citizens in a state of nervousness and panic. This, however, is neither thefirst, nor last example of tensions in the relations between Cuba and the United States, however, it is a major part in the history between these two countries. Slowly since then, these two have taken baby steps to try to establish relations and now have finally opened their borders kind of. From the Cuban revolt against Spain, the Bay of Pigs, and the Cuban Missile Crisis, we have a very long and strenuous history with Cuba. So why are we just now establishing relations?
Before we go forward, we must look back on the history between these two countries. In February of 1898, Cuba revolted against Spain. The United States sided with Cuba and forced the Spanish forces to leave. The United States stayed in Cuba and established trade with them until 1953 (Yuhas). However, things started going south after Fidel Castro took over Cuba in 1958. Relations soon ended and President Kennedy called for an operation called the Bay of Pigs. In 1961, U.S. airplanes bombed Cuban airfields, and CIA-trained exiles invaded the bay. They are soon defeated, and Kennedy is left to search for other options to bring down Castro (Yuhas). Almost in response to the Bay of Pigs, Castro and Khrushchev agree to put nuclear missiles in Cuba to "deter and future invasion" (Yuhas). Again, Kennedy decides to act and puts a military quarantine on Cuba. Finally, Soviets agree to remove the missiles if the United States removes their missiles from Turkey (Yuhas).
Since the Cuban Missile Crisis relations have improved, albeit slowly. In November of 2001, we saw Hurricane Michelle rock Cuba. In response, we send down four Amer…

Andrew Carnegie: Robber Baron or Captain of Industry essays

In the late nineteenth century, a captain of industry was a business leader whose means of amassing a personal fortune contributed positively to the country in some way. This may have been through increased productivity, expansion of markets, providing more jobs, or acts of philanthropy. Some of the nineteenth-century industrialists who were called “captains of industry” are also considered to be “robber barons.” In the nineteenth century, a robber baron was an American capitalist who acquired a fortune by ruthless means. Robber barons were accused of eliminating competition through predatory pricing and then overcharging when they had a monopoly.Andrew Carnegie was a Scottish-American industrialist who led the enormous expansion of the American steel industry in the late 19th century. By 1888, Andrew Carnegie had a large steel plant, which provided many jobs for Americans around Pittsburgh. Carnegie was one of the wealthiest and well known industrialists of his day. Many people have argued whether Carnegie was a “captain of industry” or a “robber baron” based on the jobs he provided and the way he treated his workers. One man states that Carnegie’s insatiable drive for more and more wealth, without limit was tied to his conviction that it was his duty to give it all away by the time of his death.1
Carnegie was born into a poor family, so he did not want other children to go without education. Carnegie believed that to die rich was a waste, so he wanted to give all the money he had earned to others.Before his death, Carnegie gave $60 million to fund a system of 1,689 public libraries across the country. Carnegie gave many American’s jobs, but he had hard working conditions at his steel mills. Although the conditions were bad, some still believed his almost furious philanthropy redeemed whatever he may have done to gain his power.2 The business standards one hundred to one hundred and fifty years ago are not what they are today,…

Symptoms and Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) essays

A businessman in his late forties is sitting in coach on an airplane. The seating is quite tight and he can't seem to get comfortable. Suddenly, his leg starts to tingle. Thinking that his leg just fell asleep, he starts to massage it. As he rubs, he notices a slight pain growing. He decides to squeeze between the back of a chair and another passenger, to walk it off. Within hisfirst steps, he notices the pain increase. He looks up the aisle and sees the flight attendant moving closer with her food cart. To not be in the way, he sits back down and tries to ignore the pain. He attempts to read a magazine, but can't concentrate on the article. His toes start to tingle and his calf tightens up. Curious, he stands up to head toward the restroom. The pain worsens, so he sits back down. The passenger next to him becomes irritated of his constant moving about. The businessman decides to investigate the problem in his seat. Removing his shoe and sock, he wiggles his toes at the discomfort, and pulls up his pant leg. The passenger next to him gasps.His leg had turned a red hue and swelled to twice its size.He thinks to himself how could this have happened? In fact, there is an explanation. The symptoms are a result of Deep Vein Thrombosis, or DVT.
Deep Vein Thrombosis is more common than many might think.Every year in the United States 600,000 are newly diagnosed and about 200,000 every year will die because of DVT complications (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute).What is DTV? Deep Vein Thrombosis is a blood clot deep inside the body.These veins are blood vessels that help prevent backward flow in the veins.The blood is pushed through the legs and arms when muscles contract.Deposits of red blood cells and clotting elements can build up in the vein.Having all this build up it creates a blood clot and as the clot grows it continues to block the blood from flowing.Clots usually happen in the legs and arms…

History of the Great Wall of China essays

The Great Wall of China is one of the largest building projects ever accomplished. It stretches about 1,500 miles from Bo Hai off the Yellow Sea in the East to the Gansu province in the West. It is so large it can be seen from space. A majority of the wall was built between 500-3000 years ago. The wall served to mark the boundary between the agricultural civilization of China and the civilization of the nomadic tribes of the north and northwest. The Great Wall stands 12 feet wide and 25 feet tall. The length is about 4000 miles long with a series of watchtowers standing 40 feet high and 100-200 yards apart. Along the top runs a 13-foot wide roadway. Behind the wall are intervals of permanent camps for troop guard stations. The effectiveness of the wall depended on the ability of the troops to move quickly to any point while under attack. Since the time the Great Wall has been extended, destroyed, and rebuilt, it still stands and has become one of major tourist attractions in the world.
The Great Wall was considered to be a great asset to thefirst emperor, Chin Shih-Huang-Ti, known the founder of the Chin Dynasty. He and other states of north China joined together and extended the separate walls built by earlier states to serve as a defensive barrier against the nomads, especially the Turkish tribes. It took roughly ten years to complete and long hours of hard labor. The cost of the wall in money and lives may have been a factor in the fall of the Chin Dynasty. Construction of the Great Wall began in 400 BC. Thefirst emperor of China, Chin Shih-Huang-Ti, wanted the wall built to protect his people from Mongolian invaders. He ordered just about one million people to work day and night for ten years to build the wall. The emperor Chin Shih Huang-Ti believed that his defensive barrier would prevent invasion of the Mongolian tribes. Even though the Great Wall protected against attack from outside, its building was a cause of disconte…

Ossification of Bones: Englogation and Modification essays

Intramembranous ossification takes place in the connective tissue membrane and produces the flat bones of the skull, part of the clavicle, and part of the mandible. It starts around the 8th week of development and ends at about 2 years of age. Before intramembranous ossification can take place, mesenchymal cells will condense into a soft sheet of connective tissue that is permeated with blood vessels. These mesenchymal cells will differentiate into osteochondral progenitor cells, and regions of the mesenchyme become a network of sheets called trabeculae.
Osteochondral progenitor cells gather on the surface of these trabeculae and differentiate into osteoblasts. The osteoblasts deposit an organic matrix called osteoid tissue. The osteoid tissue is contains collagen and carbohydrate-protein complexes such as proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans, and glycoproteins. The osteoid tissue is similar to bone except for a lack of minerals. Calcium phosphate will be deposited into the matrix (hydroxyapatite). When the matrix is mineralized it contains 85 percent hydroxyapatite, 10 percent calcium carbonate, and the remaining 5 percent is made up of magnesium, fluoride, sodium and potassium. As osteoblasts deposit more matrix, some of the will become trapped in the matrix and will develop into osteocytes that reside in lacunae. Osteocytes are important for maintaining the bone matrix. It is important to understand that the surface of the trabeculae remains uncalcified leading to the formation of the periosteum. The periosteum is divided into an outer fibrous layer, and an inner osteogenic layer. The inner layer contains three types of cells. They are osteochondral progenitor cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts.
Osteoblasts continue to deposit minerals forming a honeycomb of trabeculae. These tabeculae join together forming spongy bone. Osteoclasts start to resorb and remodel the trabeculae forming a bone marrow cavity. Cells in this cavity wil…

Demonic Possession During the Middle Ages essays

In Europe during the Middle Ages, being dominated by an evil entity was a terrifying possibility, especially for the pious. Emerging science was overshadowed by the Catholic religious conformity attempting to control social and economic upheavals of burgeoning nations claiming divine right. An intense battle was waged in simply surviving the temptations within the Christian cosmology which impressed a supernatural arena rife with evil onto the mortal plane of earthly life. The immortal soul was in constant jeopardy. The threat extended beyond an individual to the entirety of a kingdom, and so all outsider practices of magic were considered suspicious. Any unexpected event, therefore, could be explained with the understanding that it was caused by some external force. The concept of the other-ness of magic and resulting demonic possession was reinforced with condemnation of any deviant behavior, especially heresy. The historical position of magic and the threat of demonic possession created a social dynamic leading to greater authority of both the Church and nationalism of the State. By examining how magic was viewed, the position of the Church, and descriptions of demonic possession and those it affected, greater awareness of how intrinsic the Church was on the social structure of the Middle Ages may be construed.
The unexplained supernatural was characterized by magic, and those practicing in magical arts such as divination, casting lots, and especially necromancy were believed to also engage demons for the possession of human bodies. The spirit of evil expressed itself in nature through storms, droughts and other disasters which threatened livestock and crops, thus, the very survival of the community. In medieval times, such events were sometimes viewed as tests like the Old Testament suffering1 that could be harnessed by the devil. Victims of assumed demonic possession, however, would often pinpoint otherness within their communi…